Projects By Service

The Chapel at Air Force Village

Project Summary

The Chapel at Air Force Village, a community for retired military personnel, symbolically embodies the growth of faith; allows for the varied experiences towards faith; provides intellectual and sensual stimulation to the retirement community; and provides for the safety and comfort of community and religious routine. Designed by Bailey Edward, the form is new, complex, uplifting and revelatory.

Advanced building technology allows a concrete sculptural form to be created that is as complex and varied as the individual’s growth in their faith. Space is captured under the ground–hugging, smooth inclined planes that layer upon each other ultimately supported by the Chancel’s pinnacle form, creating an interior interplay of mass and light. The concrete protects, the glass enlightens and the form is in flight towards faith. This design beautifully maintains the religious routine through its planning, provides an uplifting experience, and honors the majesty of the retirees and their faith.

Location

Bexar County, Texas

First United Methodist Church Sanctuary and Pierce Hall Renovation

Project Summary

First United Methodist Church (FUMC) at the Chicago Temple occupies the first four floors of a 23-story building constructed in 1924. The Neo-Gothic worship space was designed by Holabird & Root in the Wesleyan style, an emphasis on preaching, seating 1,000 people in pews centered in front of the pulpit. The congregation’s focus changed from the pulpit to the altar, although the configuration of the space remained stagnant. Bailey Edward led the evolution of the sanctuary to meet contemporary worship facility needs, seamlessly upgrading the lighting, audio/visual, pew configuration, accessibility, and flexibility of the entire space while preserving the historic integrity.

The pews were reconfigured and restored to create a spacious center aisle to allow for processions and more access to the seating. The back rows of pews were taken out and a glazed movable partition was installed in alignment with the groin vault bay treatment at the underside of the balcony. This partition created a flexible fellowship space that could be separated off for different events or opened for additional seating for larger ceremonies in the sanctuary.

The original floor sloped towards the chancel, but with the implementation of the level gathering space and an accessibility ramp to the raised chancel, the floor’s slope had to be adjusted. Destructive testing of a small steel coupon verified adequate floor load capacity for a new slab, but not the seven-inch depth needed. Structural foam was utilized to reduce the load and act as an acoustical buffer to the noise of the mechanical systems located below.

The six levels of the chancel were reduced to one, expanding the area, creating more flexible space for larger instruments, including the original E.M. Skinner organ console, and making the chancel fully accessible. Each of the chancel furnishings were restored, then placed on wheels that can lock into place to provide full flexibility.

Seamless integration of multi-media components brings the sanctuary into the 21st century while honoring the space. A large projection screen recesses into an original cavity in the ceiling, enhanced lighting within the carefully restored original fixtures allows the congregation to read from a hymnal with ease and a line-array audio system ensures excellent rendition for both speaking and music performances.

Moving to the lower level, Pierce Hall’s last renovation was 35+ years ago and FUMC needed a more flexible space for its community. The redesign provides functionality for twelve different ministries ranging from a homeless ministry providing meals and supplies to the less fortunate to performances by theater company Silk Road Rising. Classrooms and large assembly space that can house 200 people were created, along with a new kitchen, bathrooms, audio-visual room and storage. Careful placement of lighting and finishes allow the space to adapt to the diverse needs of the community without compromising the look or feel of the space. FUMC was able to become a place of refuge, utilized by the public at large.

These renovations provided FUMC a place to gather before and after services, to build community within the congregation, and it allows space for visitors to see the sanctuary without disrupting services or those worshiping. Furthermore, the gathering space can be leased out to the larger community for events, garnering profit for the congregation and providing a space for various groups’ needs. Annually, the Chicago Humanities Festival utilizes the rehabilitated Sanctuary as a venue for its productions, due to its location in the loop and the flexibility provided by the new design.

Location

Chicago, Illinois

Ismaili Jamatkhana House of Worship Glenview

Project Summary

This Jamatkhana’s design reflects the group’s belief that esoteric knowledge is communicated by the Imam (prayer leader) to the Jamat (community) through numerical symbolism expressed in architecture. The building encompasses a Prayer Hall, Social Lobby, Social Hall and Char Bagh Garden; each of which received special design attention from Bailey Edward.

The Prayer Hall’s wood doors are decorated with stained glass inserts that display the symbolic patterns. The Qibla wall, positioned east towards Mecca, with tall bronze screens over long exterior windows, is flanked by carved wood panels creating a ceremonial backdrop for services. In the Social Lobby, the granite floor features an assembly of heptagons forming the symbol unique to this Jamatkhana. One-of-a-kind tapestry panels decorate the walls and custom bronze-finished lights illuminate the room. The unique heptagon is again reinvented in the design of the fountain within the Char Bagh Garden.

Location

Glenview, Illinois

Our Lady of Guadalupe Diocese

Project Summary

Amidst the trees a place of worship is carved; a clearing of space and light. Marked by the sharp edge of a man-made wall adjacent to the highway and the soft moulding of earth within the site, Bailey Edward has designed a place of introspection and communion for the future Our Lady of Guadalupe diocese.

Leading the way into the Church, the fourteen stations of the cross are made of tree trunks cut down to create the church. Therefore, the beginnings of the land serve as literal as well as spiritual support to the building. Within the worship space, the altar standing on the elevated sanctuary, serves as the main focus “of the sign of Christ himself”. Residing quietly to the side of the worship space, the tabernacle’s power lifts the roof, opening the sky to within, thus creating a deserved place to honor the Lord, present in the sacrement.

Location

Fort Wayne-South Bend, Indiana

The Compass Church Worship Center

Project Summary

The 1,525-seat worship center addition provides for fellowship gathering space, a central stage, two accessible entry/exits, restrooms and a connecting elevator that provides accessibility to the existing structure. Bailey Edward’s design for the worship center contains countless amenities typically found in a performing arts center such as a catwalk, back stage space, three large viewing screens, fully integrated audio system, and a large stage area equipped with rigging for theatrical performances. The performance space is fully functional for routine and special religious services, yet is adaptable enough to accommodate Christian rock concerts.

The increasing number of events and soaring attendance is proof of the success of the addition’s design. Enhanced spirituality is found in abundance throughout the facility due to the sweep of structural and performance elements that blend in a harmonious way.

Location

Naperville, Illinois

North Shore Baptist Church Renovation

Project Summary

North Shore Baptist Church in Chicago, IL has welcomed individuals from all over the world for the past 100 years. The historic building is home to four multicultural congregations that worship in four different languages. They needed a strategic master plan that would efficiently utilize the current space to accommodate each worship group’s necessities while providing a communal gathering space, and improving overall safety and accessibly.

Master planning began with a code and accessibility and a meeting with each faith group to identify goals and needs options. Projects were phased, space planning and renovations were outlined, and 3D renderings and floor plans were presented along with opinions of probable cost.

Phase I focused on executing necessary life safety code and accessibility upgrades on both the interior and exterior of the building. Phase I also included interior design changes to make the space feel more welcoming, such as the expansion of the narthex / fellowship space to allow congregates to gather after services without disrupting others.

Phase II includes audio and visual improvements throughout the congregation spaces, and a revised pew layout and general renovation of Howell Hall, the dedicated worship space for the Spanish-speaking members of the congregation. The goal of the design is to express the culture of the congregation and bring technological upgrades to support their contemporary-style worship sessions.

Location

Chicago, Illinois

Kenwood United Church of Christ Master Plan

Project Summary

The Kenwood United Church of Christ, established in 1885 and listed on the National Register of Historic Places, was originally designed and executed by William W. Boyington. Boyington is most well known for building the Chicago Water Tower nearly two decades earlier in 1869.

To address modern needs, Bailey Edward worked with the church to evaluate its spaces to better accommodate worship services, revenue functions, mission work, homeless missions and a medical center. A study was conducted to determine how best to utilize the church’s space, while maintaining the historic integrity of the building.

Bailey Edward examined the architectural, structural, mechanical, electrical and plumbing needs of the structure. This included addressing accessibility and building code compliance; planning to reinstate historic doors and stained-glass windows; and, developing an opinion of probable cost for the work outlined in the study.

Location

Chicago, Illinois

Compass Church Wheaton Lobby

Project Summary

The Compass Church merged with another congregation acquiring the third location in their multi-site church. The Wheaton location was built in the mid-twentieth century with a lobby addition completed in the 1990’s. The lobby was drab with worn finishes and poor lighting.

As one of the most used spaces in the building, the Compass Church wanted to update the lobby to help welcome new and existing parishioners, but had limited resources for any renovations. Bailey Edward decided to employ a phased approach concentrating the limited budget on the lobby to maximize impact to visitors. To connect the space with the other Compass Church locations, Bailey Edward applied the established color palette and furniture, fixtures and equipment guidelines we established in our Interior Master Plan for the Church. The Interior Master Plan allows flexibility to tailor to the existing conditions of each of the Church’s locations.

The lobby transformation helped unify the two congregations as well as welcome new members to the Church. Since the renovation, the congregation has seen new membership grow by 20%.

Read more about other Faith Environment Projects here

Location

Wheaton, Illinois

City of Gary Church Ruins Garden

Project Summary

Constructed in 1926, the City Methodist Church was built in the heart of Gary, Indiana. Boasting more than 3,000 members by the 1950s, the Church was home to the largest Methodist congregation in the Midwest. However, due to demographic changes, mounting repair costs and suburbanization, membership dwindled to a few hundred members by the 1970s. It was eventually abandoned in 1975.

After being abandoned for over four decades, the Church is set to be transformed and revitalized into one of the largest ruins gardens in the country creating an artful, engaging, and lush greenspace for a variety of uses. Preserving the integrity of the Church’s Tudor Revival aesthetic is top priority but requires extensive structural stabilization as discovered through extensive surveys and assessments.

Our team provided a detailed structural survey with additional site development considerations necessary for the redevelopment of the Church. Structural surveys were carried out to see how the Church can be stabilized to make the building’s clay brick foundation, foundation walls, and its decorative limestone safe for visitors once the park opens. Many of the limestone decorative pieces will need to be removed and restored to allow reinstallation once the Church is reconditioned.

Using previous reports and input from the Gary Redevelopment Commission, our team developed detailed mapping for each section of the Church. This included identifying a phased strategy for a courtyard park, stabilization, and partial demolition of the sanctuary. The final written report includes items such as: repair concepts, cost opinions, identification of Church elements too costly to preserve, a 3D model laser scan of the complex (see Design Vignette), ADA and health-life safety studies, and storm water management solutions.

After the completion of the on-site investigations, three design options were presented to the City of Gary. The chosen design option retains the sanctuary structure, the semblance of a courtyard and provides a park. The site will be enclosed by a new wall to the north and east, clad on the park side with salvaged existing stone. Planting beds, trees, and paving will create outdoor rooms and interest for park visitors with a wrought iron wall along the west and south edges of the site for after-hours security. The Church sanctuary will be structurally retained by stabilizing the top of the north and south walls, installing new steel decking and braces, infilling holes in the floor, constructing new steel trusses and purlins, and removing wood trusses and framing.

Transforming a previously abandoned historic structure to become a destination will attract tourists and help spur academic development downtown. Acting as community anchor, the ruins garden can support a variety of activities and uses that include: weddings, performing arts, photography shoots, and outdoor gathering spaces.

Location

Gary, Indiana