Projects By Service

Black Hawk State Historic Site Lodge Restoration

Project Summary

As a shining example of the depression era craftsmanship from the Civilian Conservation Corps, many of the Lodge’s features, designed by State Architect Joseph Booton in 1932, were handcrafted at the site. Although there have been a few historically insensitive modifications over the years, through careful research and thoughtful design, Bailey Edward made certain that this National Register of Historic Places structure was returned to the original Architect’s design intentions.

The restoration of the Black Hawk Lodge included a new roof system and restoration of the dormers, windows and doors. Stone throughout the Lodge was cleaned and restoration was performed on the non-historic exterior stair. The exterior light fixtures were placed with period reproduction fixtures. This project was honored with a Preservation Award from the Rock Island Historic Preservation Society and a Preservation / Restoration Award from the American Institute of Architects Central Illinois Chapter.

Location

Rock Island, Illinois

First United Methodist Church Sanctuary and Pierce Hall Renovation

Project Summary

The historic church layout was based on two side aisles with no center aisle, because the original order of service had a central pulpit with a single clergy. To address sacraments such as communion and weddings, and to accommodate universal access, Bailey Edward designed a central aisle with ramps up onto the chancel. To address the aging population, the lighting and sound system was upgraded as well. The design created a new gathering space in the back of the nave, which allows the congregation to casually gather at the back of the church. It also gives a more open perception of the church, so that visitors can pass into the back of the church without disturbing services. 

This project was honored by the Association of Licensed Architects with a Gold Award and by the Central Illinois Chapter of the American Institute of Architects with a Preservation/Restoration award.

Location

Chicago, Illinois

Illinois Army National Guard Readiness Center Renovation

Project Summary

The first known presence of the Illinois National Guard in Urbana was a cavalry which has transitioned over the years to accommodate infantry and deployment staging activities. Bailey Edward is providing architecture and historic preservation services for the renovation of the Urbana Readiness Center built in 1937, under the Federal Works Projects Administration program.

A design charrette was performed to verify program requirements, functionality of the facility and to accelerate the schedule. The scope of work includes a three-story interior addition; ADA and systems updates throughout; and, rehabilitating the exterior of this National Register of Historic Places eligible structure, which involved upgrades to meet Department of Defense Anti-Terrorism Force Protection standards without violating Illinois Historic Preservation Agency standards. The scope of work also provides for space for office, classroom and storage space; additional military and public parking; and, security lighting and fencing. This renovation is designed to achieve LEED Gold.

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Location

Urbana, Illinois

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Lincoln Hall Renovation

Project Summary

Lincoln Hall, a century-old icon at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, was in serious disrepair. Bailey Edward was appointed co-architect as historic preservationists, construction observers and liaison to the Illinois Historic Preservation Agency (IPHA) and the Capital Development Board (CDB).

A feasibility study assessed both the exterior and interior, defining the scope of work to maintain the historic integrity of the building while significantly upgrading operational efficiencies to attain LEED Platinum certification. Execution of the study involved coordination of consultants to test and analyze materials such as original paint colors, type of plaster and wood species of windows and trim, and identification of cleaning techniques for the masonry and terra cotta. Sustainability objectives also dictated an in-depth window study examining the comparative efficiency of restoring existing windows and replacing them. Commissioned by the CDB and adopted by the IHPA, this study set an industry benchmark.

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Location

Urbana, Illinois

Forest Preserve District of Will County's Riverview Farmstead

Project Summary

Riverview Farmstead is home to the District’s only farmstead and homestead. In 2000, the District started restoration and stabilization efforts with the Thomas Clow Barn Restoration Project. More recently, the District started developing preserve access, picnicking opportunities, river access and a portion of the DuPage River Trail all intended to be open to the public.

This project consisted of architectural and historic preservation services for the exterior stabilization and restoration of the Thomas Clow Farmstead and Kropp-Schulenberg Prairie and Homestead. The scope involved evaluation of structures, exterior stabilization, restoration feasibility and cost studies, and construction documents for the selected restoration efforts. Considerations were made for historical integrity, building codes and accessibility.

Location

Naperville, Illinois

North Shore Baptist Church Renovation

Project Summary

North Shore Baptist Church in Chicago, IL has welcomed individuals from all over the world for the past 100 years. The historic building is home to four multicultural congregations that worship in four different languages. They needed a strategic master plan that would efficiently utilize the current space to accommodate each worship group’s necessities while providing a communal gathering space, and improving overall safety and accessibly.

Master planning began with a code and accessibility and a meeting with each faith group to identify goals and needs options. Projects were phased, space planning and renovations were outlined, and 3D renderings and floor plans were presented along with opinions of probable cost.

Phase I focused on executing necessary life safety code and accessibility upgrades on both the interior and exterior of the building. Phase I also included interior design changes to make the space feel more welcoming, such as the expansion of the narthex / fellowship space to allow congregates to gather after services without disrupting others.

Phase II includes audio and visual improvements throughout the congregation spaces, and a revised pew layout and general renovation of Howell Hall, the dedicated worship space for the Spanish-speaking members of the congregation. The goal of the design is to express the culture of the congregation and bring technological upgrades to support their contemporary-style worship sessions.

Location

Chicago, Illinois

University of Chicago Axelrod Institute of Politics Office Renovation

Project Summary

The Institute of Politics serves as an outlet to students at the University of Chicago who wish to pursue opportunities and careers in both public and social service. The whole facility upgrade includes a new four-stop elevator, new MEP systems, ADA upgrades, new storage areas and warming kitchen. Accessibility upgrades include a ramp at the front of the building and a stair enclosure at the rear of the building that services all floor levels.

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Location

Chicago, Illinois

Kenwood United Church of Christ Master Plan

Project Summary

The Kenwood United Church of Christ, established in 1885 and listed on the National Register of Historic Places, was originally designed and executed by William W. Boyington. Boyington is most well known for building the Chicago Water Tower nearly two decades earlier in 1869.

To address modern needs, Bailey Edward worked with the church to evaluate its spaces to better accommodate worship services, revenue functions, mission work, homeless missions and a medical center. A study was conducted to determine how best to utilize the church’s space, while maintaining the historic integrity of the building.

Bailey Edward examined the architectural, structural, mechanical, electrical and plumbing needs of the structure. This included addressing accessibility and building code compliance; planning to reinstate historic doors and stained-glass windows; and, developing an opinion of probable cost for the work outlined in the study.

Location

Chicago, Illinois

Northwestern University Wieboldt Hall

Project Summary

The University needed to accommodate the growth of the School of Professional Studies (SPS) within three existing floors of the 1926 James Gamble Rogers designed building. Not only did the floors require flexible and larger classrooms but also upgraded mechanical, electrical, plumbing, fire protection, fire alarm, and tele-data communications systems in order to meet the current education and building code requirements.

Two key design functions need to be implemented when renovating and upgrading the floors. First, the SPS needs to have a large gathering area that can house career expos, fundraising events, over 100 students in lecture style format or convert to three modestly-sized classrooms. Secondly, all classrooms need flexibility to have lecture, seminar and active learning style environments. New upgrades on the 6th and 8th floors were done to support the University administrative staff. An open floor was developed for the 6th floor to create a new flexible and spacious work environment along with new detailing that matched the existing historic woodwork. Additionally, new office finishes and a main elevator lobby with a custom reception desk, student kiosk and wood feature walls were installed on the 8th floor to create an inviting and modern appearance. Notable renovations included replacing all windows with energy efficient substitutes that match the original historic design, installing energy efficient lighting and turning an underused storage room into a unisex bathroom. The renovated three floors provide 11 additional active learning classroom environments with upgraded audio-visual technology, electrical systems, windows, fire suppression and HVAC systems.

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Location

Chicago, Illinois

Birch Bayh Federal Building and U.S. Courthouse Limestone Restoration and Tuckpointing Design

Project Summary

Bailey Edward was brought on to restore the National Historic Register courthouse’s ornate limestone façade, which was in dire needs of repairs as it had been suffering from years of severe deterioration. Restoration efforts included the removal of monolithic coping stones, replacing corroded stone fasteners with stainless steel fasteners, replacing deteriorated copper thru-wall flashing with new stainless steel flashing, replacing existing lead cams, and installing new sanded sealant along the roofing interface. These repair and restoration efforts helped to extend the life of the exterior of the building by 100+ years and maintain its unique historic character.

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Location

Indianapolis, Indiana

E. Ross Adair Federal Building and U.S. Courthouse Facade and Plaza Restorations

Project Summary

The courthouse’s limestone façade was showing visible signs of stone cap displacement at the upper stone façade, parapet and parapet caps of the building. In order to accurately catalogue the locations for restoration work which included steel lintel replacement, limestone crack/spalling patching, joint repair and cleaning soiled areas, Bailey Edward used laser scanning, material testing and field surveys. Additionally, repairs were made to the buildings plaza area which required cleaning and salvaging entrance paver stones, installing new drainage systems and restoring historic lighting fixtures.

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Location

Fort Wayne, Indiana

Robert A. Grant Federal Building and U.S. Courthouse Exterior Repairs

Project Summary

The 1930s era courthouse’s limestone and masonry façade was showing several signs of deterioration with cracks, spalling and failed masonry joints, a copper-lined limestone cornice-block gutter system that had reached its life-span limit, and neglected stone entry jams and terra-cotta parapets. To address the restoration needs of the building, Bailey Edward laser scanned the building, which allowed for detailed documentation of the current scope of deterioration and limited change orders for unforeseen condition repairs. With these insights, thorough historic specifications on the repair work and products were utilized for limestone patch repair procedures, selecting non-staining sealant, cleaning methodologies and the formulation of the existing mortar to properly match in strength and color. Using a holistic approach, Bailey Edward was able to advise the GSA on prioritizing repairs through phasing recommendations to address the areas in most need of repairs.

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Location

South Bend, Indiana

White Pines Inn Addition

Project Summary

The current layout of the Inn was inefficient and posed many challenges to its day-to-day operations. One building housed a gift shop, an office space and check-in services for guests with a breezeway connecting these areas to the Inn’s restaurant. There was a lack of space for a number of key functions including entry to the restaurant, waiting area, dining/private dining spaces, and an area for a buffet and bar.

In order to better serve the Inn’s variety of functions which include hosting weddings, banquets and dinner theater performances for its guests and addition that maintains the historic integrity of the building was essential. These designs included a new entry lobby for guests, an expanded dining area that includes a bar and an expanded kitchen for the Inn’s restaurant.

Location

White Pines State Park, Springfield, Illinois

GSA Chicago Federal Center Water Infitration Study

Project Summary

For numerous years, the General Services Administration (GSA) had been monitoring multiple areas of water infiltration by having various AE firms conduct several studies in the Ludwig Mies Van der Rohe-designed buildings; formally known as the Everett M. Dirksen U.S. Courthouse and the John C. Kluczynski Federal Building. Bailey Edward performed the first comprehensive study that identified all solutions including structural issues, costs and priorities so that repairs could be implemented in a systematic manner. Using physical investigation and reviewing existing data and drawings from all previous studies and a recently completed plaza restoration project, Bailey Edward was able to determine that eight below-grade infiltration areas were under the building plaza.

To determine current conditions and identify areas of distress above and below grade, a combination of scaffolding, lifts and boson’s chairs were utilized during the façade surveys alongside other forms of destructive and non-destructive testing. Non-destructive testing included endoscopic and video televising, infrared thermography, electrical resistance, and un-calibrated water testing. Destructive testing included removing select concrete cores along with samples of sealants and expansion joints in order to view the conditions and assemblies behind the surfaces.

Thorough reports of deficiencies along with recommendations and opinions of probable construction cost were provided for review by the GSA, including review by the GSA’s historic preservation staff. A color coded 3-D digital model of the plaza and basements was developed so that inter-relationships between areas of distress and infiltration could be fully understood. In addition to presenting a digital model, the required scope of work for each area and building was reviewed and prioritized based on the level of deterioration in order to establish a phased approach based upon annual funds available.

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Location

Chicago, Illinois

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign English Building

Project Summary

The English Building is a revered part of the Main Quad on the University at the Urbana-Champaign’s (UIUC) campus. Originally built in 1905 with a major addition in 1913, the building’s architectural style is Neo-Classical and Georgian Revival, with decorative features such as a cupola, masonry chimneys, and domes which make the roof far from ordinary. Replaced only once in 1964, the slate roof had fallen into disrepair.

As preservationists, Bailey Edward took great pride in replacing the slate roof and restoring the additional roof elements to their former glory. As facility condition experts, Bailey Edward and their team first evaluated the conditions of the existing structure to develop a scope of work that could meet the University’s tight budget. The team utilized laser scanning technology, infrared thermography and other testing devices to better understand the existing conditions, and help the University phase out the work.

To preserve the integrity of the building, Bailey Edward replaced the slate roof with a new one that matched the color and shingle size of the original. The new roof, while visually identical to the old one, increased energy efficiency and brought the building up to International Energy Code standards, and lowered operating costs for the University. Windows and chimneys were rebuilt and the cupola, wood trim, and wood entablatures were all repaired and repainted.

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Location

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign Chemistry Annex Building

Project Summary

The Chemistry Annex on the campus of University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign (UIUC) is a 39.000 SF Art Moderne / Art Deco style building. Built in 1937, the building is eligible for the National Register of Historic Places and is located in a National Register of Historic Places District on UIUC’s campus.

The university wanted to preserve the historic fabric of the building while providing modern amenities and new, state-of-the-art teaching and laboratory facilities. The central stair is an exception to the otherwise utilitarian original interior and as such was considered character defining, for its location in the building, function and prominent location as well as for the use of multi-colored terrazzo, for the treads, risers and wainscot. The stair was constructed of terrazzo over a cast-in-place concrete structure. The terrazzo floor pattern at the landings is a particularly beautiful element of the interior, and characteristic of Art Modern style. The $14 million project began in July, 2013 and was substantially complete in Fall 2016. Renovations included a rehabilitation of the interior, the addition of new mechanical, electrical and plumbing systems along with new finishes. A 9,000 square foot addition was included with the renovation which houses an elevator, fire egress stairs, and collaboration spaces.

The exterior of the building was largely intact, and restoration/preservation strategies emphasized to restore the exterior to its original appearance. The exterior wall system is a cavity wall system with face brick and Hadite block backup. Plaster and painted block was the predominate interior finish. The existing wall system had no insulation in the cavity wall or the concrete spandrel panels, an extension of the cast-in place concrete which forms the buildings base. In order to meet the goal of LEED gold for this rehabilitation project, the exterior wall system needed to be thermally upgraded. Careful study and coordination with the interior build-out was required to provide two (2”) inches of open cell urethane insulation at the inside face of the exterior walls. The Chemistry Annex concrete restoration was particularly challenging. The existing exposed concrete was uncoated as it was originally installed, and patching materials needed to match the color and composition of the original material. Testing and analysis during the design phase aided in the selection of a concrete patch method that will provide long term repair of the concrete while maintaining its historic appearance. 

Many investigations were undertaken to better understand the building, such as a laser point cloud scanning to verify the size and detail of the building, which determined the building was foot longer than indicated in the original drawings. A field investigation was conducted of the location of reinforcement in the wall system for identification of localized condition or wall construction failure. Finally, field sampling and laboratory testing of original colors for materials requiring historic matching, including elements such as: windows, doors, trims, cast-in decorative panels, mortar, limestone, terra-cotta and concrete. Additionally, lifts were used to perform field inspections of the material condition of the exterior envelope, windows and roof systems.

The exterior renovations and rehabilitation included work on the exposed cast-in place concrete, spandrels and base, brick masonry (repointing and restoration), and restoration upgrades to existing historic light fixtures, terra-cotta, belt course and cornice. In addition, new aluminum windows were replaced to match the original Art Moderne aluminum windows which had previously been replaced with wood double-hung units.

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Location

Champaign, IL