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Project Thumbnails

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Project Summary

The University of Illinois at Chicago College of Pharmacy’s 1964 second floor pharmacy laboratory space did not accurately reflect the working environment in which students will serve upon graduation. To provide both sterile and non-sterile training to students, the laboratory needed to operate in two modes.

To maximize the existing space for operational efficiency and student needs, Bailey Edward provided a flexible laboratory space with mobile equipment and furniture. The space build-out created a dedicated corridor and three laboratory spaces interconnected by doors, windows, specimen pass-through interlock cabinets, and simulated magnehelic gauges. The spaces can be transformed from non-sterile to sterile working environments and back through reconfiguration and/or storage of the equipment and furnishings. To guarantee flexibility, all connections to utilities quick-disconnect from the floor. When not in use, equipment and furniture is stored in one of the two storage rooms where it is out of the way and kept in ready-condition. Fixed casework is made to disappear through the use of a retractable cleanable curtain which will visually and functionally partition off the sinks and storage for the sterile mode.

The new flexible laboratory space allows students to experience a real-world sterile and non-sterile simulated laboratory settings. New casework, flooring, ceilings, and lighting reflect the University’s commitment to cutting-edge teaching and excellence in education.

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Location

Chicago, Illinois

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Design Vignette

To increase the functionality of the space and to improve the connection to information gathering and dissemination, technology was incorporated into the laboratory design. Advanced audio-visual technology permits teaching in both modes while emulating the best practices that students will encounter upon graduation. Cameras in the hood broadcast on wall-mounted, flat-screen TVs allowing all on-site students to have a clear view of the instructor’s hands. Complete with digital storage and playback capabilities, these cameras also allow for long-distance learning. Other teaching technologies, including a mobile podium, Wi-Fi, charging stations, and conferencing capabilities, were also incorporated into the design, as well as accommodating for advances in technology.