Education

Government

Blessed%20to%20sanctuary%20-%20rendering%20-%20blessed%20to%20sanctuary%205%20-%20300%20dpi%20concrete
Exterior%2030%20dpi%20-%20rendering%20-%20exterior%20front%204%20-%20300%20dpi
Back%20300%20dpi%20-%20rendering%20-%20back%203%20-%20300%20dpi

Project Thumbnails

  • Blessed%20to%20sanctuary%20-%20rendering%20-%20blessed%20to%20sanctuary%205%20-%20300%20dpi%20concrete
  • Exterior%2030%20dpi%20-%20rendering%20-%20exterior%20front%204%20-%20300%20dpi
  • Back%20300%20dpi%20-%20rendering%20-%20back%203%20-%20300%20dpi

Project Summary

The Chapel at Air Force Village, a community for retired military personnel, symbolically embodies the growth of faith; allows for the varied experiences towards faith; provides intellectual and sensual stimulation to the retirement community; and provides for the safety and comfort of community and religious routine. Designed by Bailey Edward, the form is new, complex, uplifting and revelatory.

Advanced building technology allows a concrete sculptural form to be created that is as complex and varied as the individual’s growth in their faith. Space is captured under the ground–hugging, smooth inclined planes that layer upon each other ultimately supported by the Chancel’s pinnacle form, creating an interior interplay of mass and light. The concrete protects, the glass enlightens and the form is in flight towards faith. This design beautifully maintains the religious routine through its planning, provides an uplifting experience, and honors the majesty of the retirees and their faith.

Location

Bexar County, Texas

Vign_af%20chapel

Design Vignette

Bailey Edward’s design attends to seniors need to have a safe environment, maintain social skills and social stimulation. The plan is typical in that a congregant moves from entry to narthex to sanctuary. There are ramps on both sides of the sanctuary so that all congregants, no matter their physical disposition, can access the choir and altar. The sanctuary seating is oriented for worshippers to see each other during the sermons thus maintaining a visual tie to their community.